Chemistry

Programs offered
Gainful Employment Program Name Program Type Area of Study
Gainful Employment IconYes Chemical Technician Certificate (3701) Certificate CHEM
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  Gainful employment programs; reporting available in compliance with the U.S Department of Education

CHEM 1050 Chemistry in the Everyday World (TM) 3 Credits

This course develops and applies chemical concepts to show the importance and relevance of chemistry in our daily lives. Areas of focus include using the scientific method, atomic and molecular structure, chemical and physical changes, phases of matter, acids and bases, polymers, food chemistry, and consumer chemistry. This course is recommended for non-science majors in the fields of education, health/medical, business, and the humanities.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

CHEM 1100 Elementary Chemistry (TM) 4 Credits

Prerequisite: MATH 0850 or MATH 0890 or MATH 1080 or placement test into MATH 0950 or placement test into MATH 1180.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of beginning chemistry, including matter and energy, measurements, atomic and electronic structure, the periodic table, inorganic nomenclature, quantitative aspects of matter, stoichiometry, bonding, solutions, and acids and bases. Students will complete lab experiments related to these topics. This course is recommended for students who have never taken a chemistry course.

(6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab)

CHEM 1150 Introduction to Organic Chemistry (TM) 4 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 1100.

This course focuses on the fundamentals of organic chemistry showing the relationships between molecular structure and physical, chemical, and spectral properties for organic compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amides, esters, polymers, and biomolecules. Related laboratory work emphasize fundamental techniques applied to the isolation, synthesis, and characterization of organic molecules. This course is recommended for students in health related fields.

(6 contact hours: 3 lecture, 3 lab)

CHEM 1500 General Chemistry I (TAG, TM) 5 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 1100 or high school chemistry, MATH 1650 (can be taken concurrently) or its equivalent or placement test into MATH 1700.

This course focuses on the principles of college chemistry, including measurements and dimensional analysis, formulas, equations and stoichiometry, solution reactions, gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic and electronic structure, the periodic table, bonding, and molecular geometry. Students will complete lab experiments related to these topics. This course is recommended for students who are pursuing an associate degree, or who are science-engineering majors, or who are attempting to qualify for a career in a health field such as physical therapy.

(7 contact hours: 4 lecture, 3 lab)

CHEM 1600 General Chemistry II (TAG, TM) 5 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 1500.

This course continues the study of the principles of college chemistry, including organic nomenclature, solids and liquids, solutions, chemical kinetics, molecular equilibrium, acid-base theory, acid-base equilibrium, precipitation and complex ion equilibrium, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemistry. Students will complete lab experiments related to these topics. This course is recommended for students who are pursuing an associate degree, or who are science-engineering majors, or who are attempting to qualify for a career in a health field such as physical therapy.

(7 contact hours: 4 lecture, 3 lab)

CHEM 2000 Quantitative Analysis (TM) 5 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 1600.

This course focuses on the principles of quantitative chemical analysis including statistics, sampling techniques, acid-base equilibria and titrations, solubility calculations, complexometric titrations, oxidation-reduction titrations and gravimetric/volumetric methods. Additionally, the course introduces students to instrumental methods such as UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and chromatography. Students will complete lab experiments related to these topics. This course is intended for chemistry majors and chemical technician students.

(5 contact hours: 3 lecture, 2 lab)

CHEM 2500 Organic Chemistry I (TAG, TM) 5 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 1600.

This specialized course is the first in an organic chemistry sequence. It focuses on basic relationships between structure and physical, chemical and spectral properties for organic compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, halides, alcohols, and ethers. The course covers free radical substitution, electrophilic addition, elimination, electrophilic aromatic substitution and nucleophilic substitution reactions, with emphasis on mechanisms and stereochemistry. It also introduces infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Laboratory work emphasizes basic skills such as recrystallization, extraction, distillation, chromatography synthesis, and analysis using chemical and instrumental methods. This course is intended for chemistry majors and chemical technician, pre-medical, pre-dental, and pharmacy students.

(9 contact hours: 3 lecture, 6 lab)

CHEM 2600 Organic Chemistry II (TAG, TM) 5 Credits

Prerequisite: CHEM 2500.

This course continues the organic chemistry sequence. It emphasizes organic synthesis, structure determination, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and the use of the chemical literature. It covers aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, amides, esters, polymers, fats, amino acids, carbohydrates and proteins. Students will study nucleophilic acyl substitution, nucleophilic addition, carbanions, and polymerization mechanisms. Related laboratory experience emphasizes more advanced synthetic and analytical procedures, using both macro and micro techniques. This course is intended for chemistry majors and chemical technician, pre-medical, pre-dental, and pharmacy students.

(9 contact hours: 3 lecture, 6 lab)

CHEM 2900 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-5 Credits

These specialized courses provide in-depth examinations of topics not covered in detail elsewhere in the curriculum. Students will study such subjects as polymers, chromatography, or spectroscopy and will complete lab experiments related to these topics.

(1-5 contact hours)