Media Technology

A media technologist is a communications professional responsible for the assistance and delivery of information to the public through broadcast tools. Individuals with skills in this industry are most often required to understand and operate equipment that electronically conveys a message authored by another person or group. Media professionals are invisible to the outside world; their effective message is the only thing that should be visible of their craft. Designing effective presentations and making them easy for the public to understand is key to success. These messages can arrive to the public through such broadcast vehicles as radio, television, theatrical productions, and the Internet.

Graduates of this degree will have the necessary skills to enter the media industry or to continue their education toward a baccalaureate degree in communications technology. All students will study core skills in areas of broadcast technologies, such as audio, video (film), radio, animation, and interactive design and further in a specialty field in one of the following majors:

  • Audio Recording and Production
  • Interactive Design and Delivery
  • Radio Production and Broadcast
  • Video Production and Broadcast

These areas of study create a media professional with specific skills, but the core education in the adjacent areas allow for diversification, so the potential for career opportunities greatly increases. Employment in this field can range from corporate communications and in-house media specialists to freelance production specialists whose entrepreneurial aptitude leads to much success, especially in the film and music production industries. Many people have messages, music, pictures, and opinions that they wish conveyed to others. It is a media technologist that makes this happen in a way that delivers maximum impact.

Certificates are also available.

Programs offered
Gainful Employment Program Name Program Type Area of Study
No Audio Recording and Production Technical Major (9275) , AAB Degree MDIA
No Interactive Media Design and Delivery Technical Major (9276) , AAB Degree MDIA
No Radio Production and Broadcast Technical Major (9277) , AAB Degree MDIA
No Video Production and Broadcast Technical Major (9278) , AAB Degree MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Animation and Cartoon Arts Certificate (2504) Certificate MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Audio Engineering and Production Certificate (2503) Certificate MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Interactive Entertainment Technology Certificate (2505) Certificate MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Interactive Media Certificate (2501) Certificate MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Radio Production and Broadcast Certificate (2506) Certificate MDIA
Gainful Employment IconYes Video Production and Broadcast Certificate (2502) Certificate MDIA
Gainful employment icon

  Gainful employment programs; reporting available in compliance with the U.S Department of Education

MDIA 1003 Introduction to the Multimedia Computer 1 Credit

Media communication has grown into a diversified commodity that is mostly driven by computer applications. This is a basic training course for those who have little experience with computers or the media platform. Through lecture and demonstration, students will develop an aptitude for audio and video-based computers used in today's interactive and broadcast media industry.

(1 contact hour)

MDIA 1010 The Business and History of Broadcast and Interactive Media 2 Credits

This survey course traces the history and development of the business of presenting film, video, and audio from their first iteration to the present. Accompanying the history and evolution of the technology is a study of the business practices and legal ramifications of activities in the broadcast industry, including licensing, performance rights, and copyrighting. Through lecture and demonstration, the course develops these ideas and makes them pertinent to the media business of today.

(2 contact hours)

MDIA 1045 Writing for Broadcast and Interactive Media 2 Credits

This course is an introduction to designing and writing for various media formats. Topics include techniques for research, writing, scripting, flowcharting, and storyboarding. The course analyzes narration, commentary, news reporting, and descriptive techniques for impact in many media scenarios. It considers interactive media conventions, production issues, development models, and prototyping as they influence writing.

(2 contact hours)

MDIA 1060 Vocalization and Diction for Broadcast Media 2 Credits

One of the most important uses of broadcast media is the dissemination of information critical to the public interest. Broadcasters' voices are a key to the ability for the public to understand the communication tool that is being made available, either by television, radio, or interactive presentation. This course develops methods and techniques pertinent in the art of vocal representation in these industries and explores, in depth, the art of reading for television/radio news and commercial narration. Through a partnership with Cable News Network (CNN), lecture, historical analysis, and practical application, this course provides the building blocks for effective media journalism.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 1080 Staff Practice I 1 Credit

Prerequisite: MDIA 1200 or MDIA 1300 or MDIA 1400 or MDIA 1500 or MDIA 1600 or MDIA 1700.

A production requirement of all Media Technology Programs, this course provides students with an open forum for the development of Sound, Video, Radio, and Interactive Media Programming skills. Through direct application of media industry crafts, students will learn the skill of Media Engineering as well as related business techniques required for success in the industry. Projects provide direct demonstrations of students' abilities as engineer, producer, project leader, or team member both in group and individual settings.

(5.5 contact hours: 0.25 lecture, 5.25 lab)

MDIA 1200 Video I: Introduction to Video Production and Broadcast (TAG) 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the operation and maintenance of professional and semi-professional video recording and editing equipment. Through lecture and a hands-on approach in various lab activities, the course presents the basic techniques of professional video production. It also explores video production and editing through the use of professional broadcast-quality digital video cameras and computer-based edit and compositing systems. The course also stresses professional outcomes through videotaping activities in the studio as well as on campus.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1205 Video II: Action Videography and Video Techniques 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1200.

Unique camera angles and movement often accompany world-class media productions. Methods of attaining such shots are a process of technical acuity and accuracy. This course surveys the techniques used by standard and action videographers and implements them in real-world situations. It encourages the development of creative application to provide the videographer with greater range of artistic options. Students will include documentation of individual projects and uses of such special-effects camera tools in their portfolios.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1300 Radio I: Introduction to Radio Production and Broadcast 3 Credits

This introductory course provides practical experience in radio broadcast production using Lakeland's radio station WTLS as a working laboratory. Instruction focuses on radio production techniques and their use in a professional situation. This course provides students with practical training in applying principles of radio production and operation from a commercial as well as noncommercial point of view.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1305 Radio II: Advanced Radio Technique 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1300.

Unique and fast-paced broadcast radio marks today's airwaves. Methods of attaining such productions require skill and education to provide a process of technical acuity and accuracy. This course surveys the techniques used by radio and broadcast audio stations and implements them in real-world situations. It encourages the development of creative application to provide the radio engineer with greater range of artistic as well as technical options.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1320 Live Radio Performance and Engineering 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1300.

This course explores many aspects of the live broadcast industry as it relates to radio and sound transmission. Through case study, example, and practical application, students will experience the challenges of live production situations.

(4 contact hours: 1 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1400 Audio I: Introduction to Audio Production and Recording (TAG) 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the operation and maintenance of professional and semi-professional audio recording equipment. Through lecture and a hands-on approach in various lab activities, the course explores musical, business, and session-planning skills. Students will realize recording projects through the use of stereo and multitrack analog and digital tape-based systems. The course also explores editing and mastering functions through the use of various computer-based (Windows and Macintosh) integrated systems. It stresses professional outcomes through recording activities on campus, as well as a class project produced at a local world-class audio recording facility.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1405 Audio II: Recording and Studio Techniques 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1400.

Building upon skills acquired in MDIA 1400 Audio I: Introduction to Audio Production and Recording, this course helps students to develop technical independence in the essential aspects of audio recording and production. Students will develop professional skills, work habits, and attitudes through in-house and on-location recording projects. Students will realize recording projects, music production, and engineering for commercial use, for albums, and for video, through the use of stereo and multitrack analog and digital tape-based systems. The course also explores editing and mastering functions through the use of various computer-based (Windows and Macintosh) integrated systems. Industry skills, including studio construction and business plans, emerge on an individual basis as well as through a class project at a local, world-class audio recording facility.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1420 Basics of Sound Reinforcement 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1400 (can be taken concurrently).

This course provides students with a hands-on lab setting which presents professional techniques of all aspects of the sound system control and configuration. It includes, as part of its requirements, the production of a live media performance as well as the theoretical understanding of system design and implementation. Students will review case studies in sound system design from a stadium installation to a podium microphone for a small meeting. Students will learn to work quickly and effectively under the pressure of live performance and develop the ability to be functional in such interdisciplinary media settings as is found in live sound engineering.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1500 Interactive Media I: Introduction to Interactive Production 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the important components and issues of designing, reviewing, and producing multimedia, including markets, content, components, and phases of production. Students will gain familiarity with media's delivery vehicles such as the World Wide Web and Optical Master. The course places emphasis on the process of building multimedia products through lecture and lab exercises and provides insights into its aesthetic and historical framework.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1505 Interactive Media II: Interactive Production Technology 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1500.

This course provides an introduction to interactive media production, with an emphasis on the basics of authoring, audio, design, graphics, and video. It discusses development of multimedia models, topics, planning, and design in a project team framework and demonstrates the uses of software and equipment in authoring, graphics, audio, and video.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1540 Interactive Media Design Theory 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1500.

This course provides a basic knowledge of interface design as it applies to interactive media and Web application. It emphasizes developing interfaces in an evolving art, which requires a broad set of skills. This course discusses and describes predominant interface theories and designs.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 1600 Animation I: Introduction to Two and Three-Dimensional Animation 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the important components and issues of designing, reviewing, and producing animation, including markets, content, components, and phases of production. Students will gain familiarity with the tools, techniques, and applications of computer animation software in the two and three-dimensional worlds. The course places emphasis on the process of building animation and cartoon products through lecture and lab exercises and provides insight into its aesthetic and historical framework.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1605 Animation II: Two Dimensional Animation and Cartooning 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1600.

This course is a technique builder to animation production with an emphasis on the basics of computer aided authoring, design, graphics, and drawing. It discusses development of media models, teamwork, planning and design through project and exercises and demonstrates the uses of software and equipment in compiling two dimensional animations, graphics, audio and video.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1640 Cartoon Animation Drawing 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1600 (can be taken concurrently).

The art of animated cartoon drawing has been a prevalent and popular communication and entertainment tool since the inception of motion pictures. This course explores the application and implementation of animation and the integration of the applied art of cartooning with computer animation platforms. It describes the role and duties of the animator in both artistic and corporate situations.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 1700 Interactive Entertainment I: Introduction to Entertainment Production 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the important components and issues of designing, reviewing, and producing interactive entertainment products, such as video games, video on demand systems, and interactive entertainment web sites. Students will gain familiarity with media's delivery vehicles such as various game platforms as well as computer game development. The course places emphasis on the process of building interactive entertainment products through lecture and lab exercises and provides insight into its aesthetic and historical framework.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1705 Interactive Entertainment II: Interactive Game Design Techniques 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1700.

This course is an introduction to techniques used in interactive game programming and production with an emphasis on the basics of authoring, audio, design, graphics, and video. It discusses development of game models, topics, planning, and design in a project team framework and demonstrates the uses of software and equipment in authoring, graphics, audio, and video.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 1740 Interactive Entertainment Design Theory 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1700.

This course provides a basic knowledge of interface design and game logic as it applies to interactive entertainment applications. It emphasizes developing interfaces and concepts in an evolving art, which requires a broad set of skills. This course discusses and describes predominant interface theories and designs.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 2080 Staff Practice II 1 Credit

Prequisitie: MDIA 1080, MDIA 2200 or MDIA 2300 or MDIA 2400 or MDIA 2500 or MDIA 2600 or MDIA 2700. The advanced production requirement of all Media Technology Programs, this course provides students with an open forum for the development of media technology engineering and business skills. Through direct application of the craft of broadcast media, students will apply media industry skills necessary for successful employment in the industry. Capstone projects provide direct demonstrations of students' independent abilities as engineer, producer, project leader, or team member both in group and individual settings.

(5.5 contact hours: 0.25 lecture, 5.25 lab)

MDIA 2200 Video III: Electronic News Gathering 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1205 (can be taken concurrently).

One of the most important uses of broadcast media is the dissemination of information critical to the public interest. In times of crisis, broadcast news becomes crucial to educate the population. This course develops methods and techniques pertinent to the art of audio-only news reporting and explores the art of writing for television news in depth. Through a partnership with Cable News Network (CNN), lecture, historical analysis, and practical application, this course provides the building blocks for effective video journalism.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2205 Video IV: Independent Commercial Video Production 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2200.

This capstone course for the Video Production series is designed to provide a vehicle for students to realize real-world broadcast media projects. Professional broadcast productions require much technical and aesthetic know-how. This course explores the world of media productions through a series of case studies in the media industry. Students will apply impressions and conclusions from the studies to scenarios, both in simulated and real world situations. Final projects present true-world demonstration of individual production and on-air abilities.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2260 Video Compositing and Special Effects 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1205 (can be taken concurrently).

The creation of proper impressions in television and video production is often the responsibility of special effects supervisors and compositing experts. This course studies by survey, analysis, and practical application, the jobs, roles, and function of individuals responsible for providing special lighting, special effects, and computer-rendered manipulation. It presents and explains specific tasks, compositional style, graphic overlays, and chroma-key scenarios which students will then apply in individual and group projects.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 2265 Sports Reporting, Commentary and Videography 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1200 (can be taken concurrently).

Among the important uses of television communication is the live reporting of sporting events. "Color" commentary and live sport event reporting are skills that demand quick action and, especially in radio, impromptu verbal imagery that captivates and informs the listener. The production of live action videography, especially as it relates to sports, is a special trade that requires quick decisions and serious management skills. This course provides, through studied example and real-world practice, all aspects of sporting event videography and commentating for effective broadcast journalism.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 2300 Radio III: Electronic News Gathering 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1305.

One of the most important uses of broadcast media is the dissemination of information critical to the public interest. In times of crisis, broadcast news becomes crucial to educate the population. This course develops methods and techniques pertinent to the art of audio-only news reporting and explores the art of writing for radio news in depth. Through a partnership with Cable News Network (CNN), lecture, historical analysis, and practical application, this course provides the building blocks for effective radio journalism.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2305 Radio IV: Commercial Radio Production 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2300.

This capstone course for the Radio Production and Broadcast series is designed to provide a vehicle for students to realize real-world broadcast media projects. Professional broadcast productions require much technical and aesthetic know-how. This course explores the world of media productions through a series of case studies in the media industry. Students will apply impressions and conclusions from the studies to scenarios, both in simulated and real-world situations. Final projects present true-world demonstration of individual production and on-air abilities.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2340 Radio Business Techniques and Broadcast Direction 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1305.

This survey course traces the history and development of the business of presenting audio in a broadcast format from its first iteration to the present. Accompanying the history and evolution of the technology is a study of the business practices, political struggles, and legal ramifications of activities in the broadcast industry, including license, performance rights, and copyright. It traces the roles of radio management through demonstration, case study, and active example made pertinent to the media business of today.

(2 contact hours)

MDIA 2400 Audio III: Sound Shaping and Advanced Production 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1405.

Audio Recordings and Productions must not only encompass technical criteria for perfection, but also must satisfy artistic qualities to be a success in the media industry. This course develops awareness of the artistic attributes that make audio productions noteworthy and presents the methodology of expert technique. Through case study and practical application students will learn fine points of the audio industry as well as develop business skills that lead to a successful media career.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2405 Audio IV: Advanced Recording and Editing 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2400.

This capstone course for the Media Technology Certificate in Audio Engineering Production prepares the audio engineer for a career in the media industry. Through individual and team efforts, students will prepare noteworthy audio productions in a variety of media formats. The course stresses artistic attributes and perfection of technical abilities as well as a professional approach to a deadline-oriented business. This course helps students bridge the gap between amateur and professional and provides a framework for future employment.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2420 Foley Sound Design and Recording 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1405.

Audio production work is employed in the radio, motion picture, and television industries. Sound production for such media usually takes the form of live recording, studio sound, or Foley design. This course increases students' awareness and applicational ability of sound design. It reinforces the associated process of recording, editing, and critical listening with emphasis on creatively recreating sounds to accompany motion picture or for special audio effect.

(4 contact hours: 1 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2500 Interactive Media III: Multiple Media Integration 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1505 or permission of instructor.

This course explores the tools and applications that provide for the incorporation of audio, video, graphics, and content into an interactive computer-based delivery medium. Through a variety of lecture and lab activities, the course uses computer-based media systems to develop the necessary skills for professional interactive media integration. Programs utilized include industry standard integration packages such as Macromedia Director and Web authoring and development tools.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2505 Interactive Media IV: Advanced Interactive Presentation 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2500.

This studio course acquaints students with major aspects of interactive media portfolio preparation and presentation. Emphasis is on team production, with each student preparing a personal portfolio. This capstone course introduces and studies professional criteria necessary for employment in the media industry.

(5 contact hours: 1 lecture, 4 lab)

MDIA 2560 Interactive Educational Design 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2500.

Interactive media is a method of communication which is becoming a prevalent form of information dissemination. Its design and structure make it a perfect vehicle for educating large numbers of people over great distances. This course explores the philosophy, application, and implementation of interactive educational programming and describes the role and duties of Informational Technologists in both individual and corporate situations.

(3 contact hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab)

MDIA 2600 Animation III: Three Dimensional Animation 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1605.

This course explores the tools and applications that provide three-dimensional animation for video, cartoon, and special effects graphic content as delivered through an interactive computer-based system. Through a variety of lecture and lab activities, the course will use animation development systems to develop the necessary skills of the professional animator. Programs utilized in this class will include industry standard integration packages.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2605 Animation IV: Advanced Animation 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2600.

This capstone course for the Animation and Cartoon Arts series is designed to prepare students for a career in the animation industry. Through individual and team efforts, students prepare noteworthy animated and cartoon productions in a variety of media formats. The course stresses artistic attributes and perfection of technical abilities as well as a professional approach to a deadline-oriented business.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2660 Virtual Set and World Design 2 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2600.

The design of visual backgrounds used in media presentations has become a large part of the broadcast and interactive media industry. Designing two and three-dimensional "virtual sets" has become so sophisticated that it is often difficult to determine what backgrounds are real and which have been created by the virtual artist. This course explores the application and implementation of computer animation platforms in the design and development of virtual worlds and explains through practical application the interaction of virtual and real world media components.

(4 contact hours: 1 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2700 Interactive Entertainment III: Applied Game Logic 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 1705.

This course explores the integration of tools and applications for game development with principles of game logic and artistic design. Through a variety of lecture and lab activities, the course will use computer-based media systems to develop the necessary skills for professional interactive media integration. Programs utilized in this class will include industry standard development packages providing computer-based games as well as games for standard industry video platforms.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)

MDIA 2705 Interactive Entertainment IV: Advanced Game Design and Production 3 Credits

Prerequisite: MDIA 2700.

This studio capstone course acquaints students with major aspects of interactive entertainment portfolio preparation and presentation. Emphasis is on team production, with each student preparing a personal portfolio. The course introduces and studies professional criteria necessary for employment in the game media industry.

(5 contact hours: 2 lecture, 3 lab)